Elected president of Texas in September 1844, Jones took office in December. He had not given a campaign speech, had not committed to annexation, and had not mentioned the subject in his inaugural speech. After the election of James K. Polk as President of the United States on a platform of “annexation back (??) by Texas” and President John Tyler`s proposal for annexation by a joint resolution, Jones continued his silence. But the Texas Congress has declared that it is joining the Union. (Note: How did the Texas Congress say it joined when it was postponed and never was convened again?) Before Jones received official notification of the joint resolution, accusations from England and France led him to postpone the action for ninety days. He promised to get Mexico to recognize Texas independence and delayed the convening of the Texas congress or congress. On March 18, 1845, with the voice of his cabinet, he sent an offer of annexation to the Republic of Texas by mail, exclusively under the conditions of the Brown Foster option of the joint house operation. [178] Minister Calhoun informed President-elect Polk of the action, which backed down without comment. [179] [180] Tyler justified his preemptive approach by the fact that Polk would likely be pressured to stop the immediate annexation and resume negotiations under the Benton alternative. [181] 3 – CONVENTION OF 1845. The Convention of 1845 was convened by Anson Jones to meet in Austin to consider the joint resolution of the United States Congress, which proposed the annexation of the Republic of Texas to the United States.

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