A service level agreement is an agreement between two or more parties, one of which is the customer and the other service providers. It can be a legally binding formal or informal “treaty” (e.g. B internal departmental relations). The agreement can include separate organizations or different teams within an organization. Contracts between the service provider and other third parties are often referred to as SLAs (wrongly) – since the performance level is set by the (principal) customer, there can be no “agreement” between third parties; These agreements are simply “contracts”. However, company-level or OLA-level agreements can be used by internal groups to support ASAs. If an aspect of a service has not been agreed with the customer, it is not an “SLA”. Uptime is also a common metric, often used for data services such as shared hosting, virtual private servers, and dedicated servers. The rewards and penalties applicable to the supplier are often indicated. Most LTC also leave room for periodic (annual) audits to make changes.

[3] A Web Service Level Agreement (WSLA) is a standard for monitoring compliance with Web services service level agreements. Authors can specify the performance assigned to a web service application, the desired performance goals, and the actions to take if performance is not achieved. As applications are moved from dedicated hardware to the cloud, they must achieve the same or even more demanding service levels as traditional installations.