When drafting an agreement, it is important to recognize that there are two types of state laws governing divorce: equitable distribution by 41 states and common property, practiced in some variants of 9 states. A written agreement in a State of common ownership should not be designed in such a way as to regulate what happens in a State of equitable distribution and vice versa. It may be necessary to use lawyers in both States to cover the possible case where the parties live in a State other than the one to which they were married. Often, people have more than one home in different states or move a lot because of their work, so it`s important to consider this when developing. Remember that even after marriage, you can sign a marital property contract. However, this agreement is called a succession agreement or post-up. You can also refuse or change your marriage contract after your marriage. But since two out of five marriages result in divorce, some questions arise. How do you want your property, debts and assets to be managed in the event of divorce or death? Should one of the spouses receive alimony? A growing number of engaged couples are thinking about these and other issues before marriage. Some couples decide that the best way to prepare for all eventualities is to create a marriage contract. When a U.S. citizen decides to marry an immigrant, that person often serves as a visa sponsor to apply to enter or stay in the United States. The Department of Homeland Security requires that people who sponsor their immigrant fiancé come to the United States on a visa to make an affidavit of support,[49] and it is important to consider the affidavit of support to a U.S.

sponsor about to reject a marriage contract. The affidavit of support creates a ten-year contract between the United States. The government and the sponsor who require the sponsor to financially support the immigrant fiancé from the sponsor`s own resources. [50] As explicitly stated on Form I-864, the divorce does not terminate the support obligations that the sponsor owes to the United States. . . .